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Parental Involvement with Young Kids May Help Later Academic Performance

January 29, 2014 / Parents Magazine

Parental Involvement with Young Kids May Help Later Academic Performance
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TEASER Parents who are involved in active play with their children during their toddler and preschool years may have better academic performance to look forward to, according to new research.
TITLE Parental Involvement with Young Kids May Help Later Academic Performance
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By Holly Lebowitz Rossi

Parents who are involved in active play with their children during their toddler and preschool years may have better academic performance to look forward to, according to new research by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The findings come from a study of African American boys who were transitioning from preschool to kindergarten.

“The transition to kindergarten can be challenging for many children due to new expectations, social interactions, and physiological changes,” said Iheoma Iruka, the study’s lead author, in a statement. “Transitions may be even more arduous for African American boys, given the many challenges they are likely to face compared to their peers.”

Iruka found four patterns for African American boys after they transitioned—and her team also demonstrated the key role that parenting plays in these outcomes.

Just over half the boys (51%) showed increases in language, reading, and math scores in kindergarten, but a sizeable group (19%) consisted of low achievers in preschool who declined even further academically after transition. The smallest group (11%) included early achievers who declined in kindergarten both academically and behaviorally; by contrast, 20% of the boys in the study comprised a group of early achievers who remained on their high-performing academic and social paths after the transition.

Click here to read more of this article from our friends at Parents.com.

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